Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Imajin Book’s Summer Sizzles Ebook Sale, July 1 - 15!

My publisher, Imajin Books, is about to launch a terrific two-week sale on their ebooks from July 1st to July 15. My first Evan Dunstan mystery novella, DEAD MAN FLOATING, will be on sale for only $.99 (U.S.) through the following links:




Smashwords: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/573302, (use promo code HF32M)

One wrong decision…

Security guard Evan Dunstan didn’t expect to find a body floating in a campus stream. An empty vodka bottle nearby suggests that the highly despised George Krenn, head of the plumbing department, had drunkenly fallen in. Refusing to let the death of a vile man ruin his romantic plans, Evan decides to leave the body for the next shift to find.

One friend in trouble…

When it’s discovered that Krenn was murdered, Evan has a lot of explaining to do. So does his friend Sully, Krenn’s least favourite student. Evan uses his hacking skills and campus knowledge to keep them both out of jail, but the investigation forces him to question Sully’s innocence.

One mystery to solve…

Uncovering the truth proves to be more than challenging. It may cost Evan his job, his friendship, and his woman. Will Evan find the killer, or will the killer find him first?





Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Using Flash Fiction as an Outline

I've done Story A Day May for five years, now. Last year, I intended every story to feed into a collection of various previously established characters of mine. The ones based in the SAGE world, I collected, along with some others, into SHIFTY. But, in 2014, I wrote one called Salali and Vernando. That also ended up in SHIFTY, but not quite in the form I had thought.

If you follow the link and read the entry, you'll see that what I have is a bare-bones tale, with a segment in the middle that merely catalogs action. I also had a notion that everything I wrote would be only the first part of an adventure tale.

When I started expanding the story, I front-loaded A LOT of explication, backstory, and world-building into the running-away section. I tend to do that, damn my eyes. I put so much on the story's head, it falls over backward and can't get up off the floor. But, because I had written all that detail, I was able to cut almost all of it out and merely touch on it, using telling details in place of elaborate paragraphs. While I was at it, I added an encounter that turned out fortuitous, as such encounters so often are in fairy tales.

I was wrong about the continuation. The longer section of the story stub turned out to be the only adventure in it. In a way, that's too bad, because I do like a tale that goes on and on, with chases and narrow escapes and magic combs and such. This one ended up as sort of a locked-room adventure, I guess.

THE POINT IS, I've turned quite a few flash fiction pieces into longer stories, and stories into novels.
Pick the story apart. Each thing that happens is a plot point. Each plot point can be expanded and/or bracketed by rests between the beats. Room can be made for subplots. And this can all be done formally, with Roman Numerals and Capital Letters, or informally, by the seat of the pants, with the short version serving as a series of torches to show the way.

Marian Allen, Author Lady
Fantasies, mysteries, comedies, recipes

Wednesday, June 07, 2017

Revisiting My Old Fictional Friend

(reposted from my new WordPress blog)

I’m one of those weird writers who likes to work on several novels at once. The upside is that I’m never ever bored. The downside is that it takes a while to see the books published.

Since I find it impossible to release three or four new titles a year to stay visible, (trust me, I’ve tried) it’s not a huge issue. The truth is that I like to take my time with plots…allow them to simmer and merge into a story with seamless subplots and layers of character development.

So, after a nearly eighteen month hiatus, I’m finally ready to start the sixth draft of my 6th Casey Holland mystery, still untitled. This WIP has been around a while, ever since I met a bus driver a few years back. He’d been assaulted three times on the job, and has since changed careers.


 Although I was working on book five this spring (now in my editor’s hands), it feels like I haven’t visited Casey in a long time. I think this way because Casey’s in a different place emotionally in book six than she was in the fifth installment. It’ll be interesting to catch up on the latest challenges in her life. How has she grown? What new challenges must she face, beyond crime solving?


I’ve been writing about Casey for many years, and I’ve changed more than she has. Certainly, my perspective has changed, but that can be a good thing. Authors, like their protagonists, need to grow and change, don’t you think?


Sunday, May 28, 2017

The Dreaded Back Cover Blurb: My Progress So Far

Members of my critique group have witnessed my struggle to write a compelling back cover blurb for my 5th Casey Holland mystery, Knock Knock. Soon, my editor will be working with it and chiming in. Anyone who’s attempted to write a back cover blurb knows how daunting this vital process is. Many readers make decisions on whether to buy a book or not based on that blurb.

So, it was timely to come across a how-to blog about writing a back cover blurb, and for different genres. For my genre, mystery and suspense, author Marilynn Byerly provides a four paragraph process, but she also provides tips for paring it down.

Essentially, she says that the back cover blurb should set up the plot and the protagonist’s emotional investment in the first paragraph. Paragraph two should elaborate on more plot set up and emotional involvement, or more information about the victim. The next two paragraphs focus on the stakes and the obstacles the protagonist must overcome. What is the interior conflict?

Here’s the tentative draft, version no. 342, or thereabouts. I lost count...

The latest attack in a string of violent Vancouver home invasions kills senior Elsie Englehart. Security officer Casey Holland is devastated. She’s let Elsie down. Casey’s supposed to be watching over elderly bus riders in an affluent, high-risk area.

Determined to keep others safe, Casey escorts an elderly man home one afternoon, but an armed intruder forces his way in and attacks them both. Hospitalized and frustrated, Casey struggles to regain control of her life, despite interference from family and colleagues.

Her fiancĂ© wants to postpone their wedding, and Casey’s boss cuts her out of the loop. Another violent home invasion compels Casey to take action, but at what cost to her health, her relationship, and her career?

Find out in Debra Purdy Kong’s fifth installment, Knock Knock, where the risks have never been higher, or the consequences more deadly.


I think it’s almost there. But I certainly welcome input. For those who want to read blurb suggestions for other genres, check out Marilynn’s suggestions HERE.



Sunday, May 21, 2017

Mystery and Fantasy Story Arcs: A Big Difference

Before I get into today’s topic, please note that my books are now listed on the popular BookBub site. I’ve belonged to BookBub a while, and whenever an author I’m following releases a new title, I receive notification. If you’d like to follow me, you can do so HERE.

I first learned about story arcs at the Surrey International Writers’ Conference years ago, and also from an agent I was working with at that time. For new writers, or readers of books, a story arc is an overview of the beginning, middle, and end of a story.

While writing mysteries, I’ve learned that dividing my story arc into three acts works well for me. The first act sets up the murder, suspects, protagonist, and sidekicks. The second act presents, obstacles, danger, clues, setbacks and twists. The final act supplies the final pieces of the puzzle and leads to resolution.

Some authors prefer a story arc in four acts, and others even uses a more detailed seven step approach that includes defining a big event, raising the stakes and action, creating an exceptional event, a big dark moment, and finally the conclusion.

While working on my first urban fantasy, it’s become obvious that my story arc is far more intricate than the straightforward three-act narrative I’ve been using. The book is divided into five sections right now, and each section requires its own story arc.

Chapters also require their own story arc—a point and a purpose that move the plot along, even if it’s all told through backstory. The trick will be not to become overly repetitive, as each of the main characters’ sections might overlap with the others. We’ll see how it goes.

I’m still in the early stages of the second rewrite, but am finding that it’ll soon be necessary to plot each chapter and section on an Excel sheet. This will help remind me of the purpose of each chapter while staying focused on the story arc in each section, and the overall big picture. It’s a daunting task, but one that I’m really enjoying.



Another Use For Interviews

Did you ever hit a point where you wonder why you do what you do, how you got started in it, how you got where you are (wherever that is), what's holding you back, and what's pulling you on?
I don't, but maybe you do.
ANYWAY, whether you do or you don't, those aren't bad questions to ask. And here's an idea for coming up with questions: Go to interview sites. Copy the questions. Then answer them.
I'm thinking of author interviews, naturally; I'm pretty sure there are actor interviews galore; for all I know, there are sites that interview dog-catchers, trash collectors, cat-toy designers, and goat breeders. But I'm talking about authors.

WHAT BOOKS INFLUENCED YOUR STYLE?

Hard one. "All of them" isn't really useful. See if you can pin it down. If you're struggling with your voice, maybe you haven't fully integrated your influences into yourself. Maybe you're trying a voice that doesn't work well with the kind of story you're working on. Maybe a little smoothing, tweaking, or adjusting the mix will help.

WHEN DID YOU KNOW YOU WANTED TO BE A WRITER?

Well, when did you? Did you have an imaginary friend and suddenly realize you had made it up, like a character in a book? Did you have a school assignment that clicked? Did you read a novel and think, "Geez -- I could do better than that!"?

WHAT BOOK DO YOU WISH YOU HAD WRITTEN AND WHY?

"Because it made a billion bucks" doesn't count. What is it about that book that connects with you as a writer? What did the author accomplish that you want to accomplish?
~*~
You get the picture. By finding and answering interview questions, we might get in touch with all that mess in there that makes us the writers we are. If we do the interview for ourselves alone, we just might find out something about "the man behind the curtain" we'd just as soon not share, but can benefit (as writers and as people) from knowing.
I'm participating in Story A Day May again this year. If you want 31 dashed-off stories to beguile your time, hop on over to my Story A Day May category and help yourself to some free reading!
Marian Allen, Author Lady
Fantasies, mysteries, comedies, recipes